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This is the DigiBarn itself, complete with pigs (not really easily seen in this picture)

This is the DigiBarn itself, complete with pigs (not really easily seen in this picture)

These are two of the three DigiBarn pigs, unless you aren't a Mac fan, in which case there were a whole lot more :)

These are two of the three DigiBarn pigs, unless you aren't a Mac fan, in which case there were a whole lot more :)

Here the DigiBarn staff receives final instructions before the doors open to the public.

Here the DigiBarn staff receives final instructions before the doors open to the public.

There was a prominently placed Mac Alcove full of Mac books, magazines and other paraphernalia.

There was a prominently placed Mac Alcove full of Mac books, magazines and other paraphernalia.

The

The "Install" booth was where you signed into the museum.

The Bootup area was where you started your tour.

The Bootup area was where you started your tour.

This is the DigiBarn logo, pigs and all.

This is the DigiBarn logo, pigs and all.

Here is a picture of the Museum curator, Bruce Damer, receiving a donation from Sellam Ismail.

Here is a picture of the Museum curator, Bruce Damer, receiving a donation from Sellam Ismail of Vintage Computer Festival fame.

Bruce Damer is the Museum curator and resident collector.

Bruce Damer is the Museum curator and resident collector.

Here are some of the old portable computers displayed at the DigiBarn.

Here are some of the old portable computers displayed at the DigiBarn.

And some more portables. . .

And some more portables. . .

And even more portables.

And even more portables.

There was some old pre-computer computing equipment mixed in with all of the microprocessor driven systems.

There was some old pre-computer computing equipment mixed in with all of the microprocessor driven systems.

An Amiga 2500 was one of the many GUI machines on display.

An Amiga 2500 was one of the many GUI machines on display.

Several different Xerox workstations were scattered about the premises.

Several different Xerox workstations were scattered about the premises.

As was a whole collection of Apple computers from the Apple II+ on up.

As was a whole collection of Apple computers from the Apple II+ on up.

One of the DigiBarn's most amazing exhibits is a Cray 1 nestled in the back of the barn.  This beast was, in its day, the fastest computer on the planet.  The circular form allowed the engineers to keep wire lengths as short as possible but created a heating problem that was solved via liquid cooling.

One of the DigiBarn's most amazing exhibits is a Cray 1 nestled in the back of the barn. This beast was, in its day, the fastest computer on the planet. The circular form allowed the engineers to keep wire lengths as short as possible but created a heating problem that was solved via liquid cooling.

Some of the rarest computers in the public arena are so called Tempest machines.  These machines were designed to have so little radiation that their inner workings would be undetectable to spies who could otherwise detect what they were being used for.  The DigiBarn has two Macs that were built to these specifications.

Some of the rarest computers in the public arena are so called Tempest machines. These machines were designed to have so little radiation that their inner workings would be undetectable to spies who could otherwise detect what they were being used for. The DigiBarn has two Macs that were built to these specifications.

Here is MacTV - a Macintosh with a TV tuner which was supposed to be a

Here is MacTV - a Macintosh with a TV tuner which was supposed to be a "dorm PC."

Here is a fairly rare Kurzweil minicomputer.

Here is a fairly rare Kurzweil minicomputer.

The DigiBarn has a working copy of Microsoft Windows 1.0 running on at least one of their machines.

The DigiBarn has a working copy of Microsoft Windows 1.0 running on at least one of their machines.

In the home computer area the DigiBarn was showing two major players from the early 1980's - the Atari 400 and the Commodore 64.

In the home computer area the DigiBarn was showing two major players from the early 1980's - the Atari 400 and the Commodore 64.

This sign beckoned visitors into the room full of the real antiques.

This sign beckoned visitors into the room full of the real antiques.

Dwight Elvey demonstrated his Intel 4004 development system.  The 4 bit 4004 was Intel's first microprocessor.

Dwight Elvey demonstrated his Intel 4004 development system. The 4 bit 4004 was Intel's first microprocessor.

A MOS technologies Kim 1 was on display.  This was a very early 6502 based single board computer.

A MOS technologies Kim 1 was on display. This was a very early 6502 based single board computer.

Here, an original IBM PC sits next to the first clone of that PC, the Eagle.

Here, an original IBM PC sits next to the first clone of that PC, the Eagle.

The DigiBarn posesses a very nice original Macintosh with all of its original packaging.

The DigiBarn posesses a very nice original Macintosh with all of its original packaging.

A well preserved and well equipped TRS-80 Model 1, step 2 was on display.

A well preserved and well equipped TRS-80 Model 1, step 2 was on display.

A Sol Terminal Computer and a Commodore Pet sat side by side.  Both were significant for being very early

A Sol Terminal Computer and a Commodore Pet sat side by side. Both were significant for being very early "all in one" PCs. They came with keyboards and displays (or hookups for a display) when most machines were programmed via the front panel or external devices such as terminals or teletypes.

This Altair 8800 wasn't running perfectly, but it was a nice, clean example of one of the first PCs ever.

This Altair 8800 wasn't running perfectly, but it was a nice, clean example of one of the first PCs ever.

The Imsai 8080 could probably be called the first ever PC clone.  It was a copy of the MITS Altair 8800 with several improvements that made it a far more desirable machine.  Imsai outlasted MITS by many years.

The Imsai 8080 could probably be called the first ever PC clone. It was a copy of the MITS Altair 8800 with several improvements that made it a far more desirable machine. Imsai outlasted MITS by many years.


(Submitted November 5, 2015 00:11:06 by R Agee)

The Atari was marketed as a game machine. So the actual power it possessed as a personal PC was not acknowledge. It used Atari Basic which could not run on another machine. Microsoft Basic was later offered, Software was easily pirated and could be found everywhere, Software developers often lost money. Disc drive was single sided @ 160K capacity. 810 proved an opportunity to interface with homeberew devices. Joystick ports were great for imputing signals. I built a home security/alarm system back in the 80's using an Atari 800, Also used it as a Ham Radio CW and RTTY AFSK terminal IMHO a great little machine.


(Submitted March 6, 2008 12:33:10 by Charlie Gibbons)

In the 3rd last picture, it looks like there's a advertisment balloon covering the computer's keyboard. Wonder what it says?


(Submitted August 10, 2006 23:12:07 by Gary Phillips)

Any interest in a Leading Edge Model D


(Submitted March 17, 2006 09:11:23 by Bill Ulrich)

are you open during the week for visits. A friend of mine and I would like to come up. We are computer guys - working with systems since the mid-70s. Bill Ulrich (831-464-5346)


(Submitted September 26, 2005 06:36:54 by Chris the Nock)

Imsai outlasted MITS by many years -- technically true, but surely it needs a footnote. The IMSAI that outlasted MITS was not the same IMSAI that competed with MITS.


(Submitted March 23, 2005 19:37:36 by Irma Robertson)

Hello, I have an Apple 2 that my dad had bought me in 1983 but I do not know anything about it. It still works perfectly fine as I also still have some games for it. I was going to send to the garbage bin but decided against it for now. Would you be able to help me in finding out more info? Thanks Irma Robertson

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