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Heathkit ET-3100 Electronic Design Experimenter


Description
Manufacturer Heath, Inc.
Model ET-3100 Electronic Design Experimenter
Date Announced Unknown
Date Canceled Unknown
Number Produced Many tens of thousands
Country of Origin USA
Price Unknown
Current Value Up to $50 or so
Specifications
Processor None
Speed N/A
RAM 0
ROM 0
Storage N/A
Expansion N/A
Bus N/A
Video None
I/O N/A
OS Options None
Notes The Heathkit ET-3100 isn't actually a computer but it did allow students to learn some of the basics of the logic that powered early (and even modern) computers.
Related Items in Collection Heathkit ET-3200, Heathkit ET-3400
Related Items Wanted


The Heathkit ET-3100 is a fairly simple device containing some power and signal generation circuitry along with a breadboard for creating electronics experiments using those features.

The device in my collection was donated by Mary-Anne Boulet.


(Submitted December 1, 2014 08:45:03 by Robert)

Need Manual for Heathkit EE-3100 and EE-3100B. I have both of them but need to replace odd ball lamp and other parts.


(Submitted September 9, 2013 09:15:11 by manuel)

Hello, Where do you think i can acquire 100K potentiometer, for this kit (ET-3100)?

I would like get an original part that is:

10-1055 100K LIN 1377704 (that is written in potentiometer enclosure).

Or in alternative some closer configuration.

Best regards


(Submitted April 29, 2013 12:00:55 by doug.d)

I am looking for a manual for the et-3200a if someone can send me a pdf file on it i would be very appreciated


(Submitted March 27, 2012 18:43:11 by thor)

can someone supply me with the manual for this model?


(Submitted October 24, 2008 20:37:58 by David)

I've inherited an ET-3100 from an uncle of mine. It came with two workbooks, but no accessory wires for projects. It's in mint condition - looks like new compared to the picture above. We are thinking of trying to sell it - what would a fair asking price be?


(Submitted October 2, 2008 09:36:27 by Robert)

This was used with Heath's AC and DC courses. There isn't a lot of circuitry involved - a transformer, function generator and variable regulated supply. You could build one of these really cheap. Schematics are all over the web.


(Submitted May 9, 2008 16:23:28 by Mike)

This is definitely not a computer or even something that does logic. It is more of a signal generator. I was going to say synthesizer but the lowest frequency is 200Hz--in the audio range, but not at all to the bottom of it. I think it could be used for computer clocking up to, well, As I look at it again, the top of the audio range, 20kHz.

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