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Thread: Why no love for the Coleco ADAM?

  1. #11
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    Maybe add in the Mattell Acquarius and the other lesser known game system crossover computers. Here is a good article from the day that I pre dates the Adam but is in the same class of consumer stuff. There were a lot of special interest groups that focused on these types of systems. A lot of the correspondence was about how to makes these systems more useful. Out of the box the Adam is limited, yes. Not really my thing personally.

    http://vintagecomputer.net/cisc367/C...ics%20Show.pdf
    http://www.vintagecomputer.net (my blog) and http://www.midatlanticretro.org (VP MidAtlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists)

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    Really disappointed to see the negative comments. To those folks, let me say this:

    1) The Coleco ADAM had a big software library (not sure where your facts are coming from).

    2) Those problems with the electromagnetic surge and any other faults were fixed by the 2nd wave of ADAMs produced.

    3) Programming language in ROM? The ADAM had a WORD PROCESSOR IN ROM! That sounds way more useful.

    Btw, nice find billdeg!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Salvato View Post
    3) Programming language in ROM? The ADAM had a WORD PROCESSOR IN ROM!
    Coleco was ahead of the curve on this one, as in 1983, most home computers were used by kids for games and BASIC programming. The home market for word processing had not really developed yet, due to the significant extra expense for a printer. I know Coleco saw it as giving you a good deal by packaging the printer with the system, but for people who didn't need or want a printer, they saw it as an unnecessary expense and waste of desk space.

  4. Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    Coleco was ahead of the curve on this one, as in 1983, most home computers were used by kids for games and BASIC programming. The home market for word processing had not really developed yet, due to the significant extra expense for a printer. I know Coleco saw it as giving you a good deal by packaging the printer with the system, but for people who didn't need or want a printer, they saw it as an unnecessary expense and waste of desk space.
    That's a good point, but Coleco was targeting the ADAM for educational purposes. It's funny, I must have been one of the few kids that was excited to have a printer; I was always typing stuff out on that machine gun sounding printer =)

  5. #15

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    Kids like dot matrix graphics printers back then, typing up letter quality reports is not exactly thrilling. I had a dot matrix printer connected to my C64 in the 80's but mostly just gamed on C64.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Kids like dot matrix graphics printers back then, typing up letter quality reports is not exactly thrilling. I had a dot matrix printer connected to my C64 in the 80's but mostly just gamed on C64.
    Also remember that typing/word processing was still considered to be secretarial work in the '80s -- i.e. a woman's job. So call it sexist or old-fashioned, but a computer with a typewriter-style printer attached was not something a boy would've wanted to have back then, unless he was the type of boy who also wanted an Easy-Bake Oven.

  7. Wink Feminist here

    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    Also remember that typing/word processing was still considered to be secretarial work in the '80s -- i.e. a woman's job. So call it sexist or old-fashioned, but a computer with a typewriter-style printer attached was not something a boy would've wanted to have back then, unless he was the type of boy who also wanted an Easy-Bake Oven.
    Call me a feminist then! I love printing stuff out, even if it wasn't pictures.

    Actually, as soon as I got the SmartFiler program, I was all about sorting and organizing my files, which carried over to things around the bedroom =)

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