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Thread: Today my wife...

  1. #1

    Default Today my wife...

    ...and her friends were discussing the hobbies their husbands enjoy. One of my wife's friends commented that her husband gets very excited when one of the cards in his baseball card collection increases in value. She thought it was weird. My wife then pipes up and says "oh ya..you think that's bad? My husband collects old computers." After which her friends all agreed that my hobby is the weirdest of them all.

    ...we're so misunderstood.

  2. #2

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    lol.. I'm surprised any of the cards go up in value these days. They pretty much took a dive after "we" grew up IIRC. Not that they would compare profit margins but I think ya got most hobbies beat as far as an investment goes. The number of as-is and nonworking systems that still sell for big bucks, but as always.. it takes money to make money.
    Looking to acquire: IBM 5100, Altair 8800

  3. #3

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    I think the older cards (pre 1970's) might be a good investment (hall of famers). I ditched all my baseball cards in the late 1980's early 1990's when prices were stupid. There are plenty of old hobbies that are dead or dying because few people bother collecting them anymore (coins and stamps) but rarities are worth more and more while common stuff is worthless.

    The computer hobby will shake out sooner or later, real desired rarities will be worth something and junk will be scrapped. Most poeple doing this as an investment will probably be screwed.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  4. #4

    Default

    collect what ya like, let em talk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,629

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    The computer hobby will shake out sooner or later, real desired rarities will be worth something and junk will be scrapped. Most poeple doing this as an investment will probably be screwed.
    Agreed, although I think this is true for all hobbies. I don't think anyone really made any money collecting comics, coins, stamps, etc. Dealers, on the other hand, usually do. My father is a famous numismatist so I had this drilled into me from an early age.

  6. #6

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    I think a few people who were just crazy collectors (before their particular collectable was mainstream) could have made a decent chunk of change (if they wanted to sell out). Some people can jump in when something is getting hot and buy the best stuff and keep it for a while to make a profit. But the vast majority of people don't collect anything that ends up being worth much more then the money and time they spent to get it. Even people who get lucky in a find probably have a ton invested in other things they can't sell.

    I do agree that dealers are (or were pre ebay) the ones who made the money because they tended to do well with selling supplies plus getting buyers and sellers together. With online auctions the days of the dealers is a bit limited unless they can buy up rarities for little money from people who have no clue what they have. I recall in the 1980's when stamps were peaking a bit sitting at the local coin & stamp shop and seeing buyers from the big name companies trying to buy the local guys best stuff for pennies on the dollar so they could sell it to collectors at retail. Even then the small shops had a hard time selling inflated zepplin sets for half of what the big dealers were getting, they had to drag massive amounts of premium stuff to the big conventions to make a buck.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  7. #7

    Default

    Yes, there are collectors and collectors.

    Not everyone collects with market value in mind. Many don't want to make money. The want the item for some emotional or nostalgic reason, only very loosely connected to resale value. To them it's worth what they paid, they intend to hang onto it and if they do eventually sell it then it's served it's emotional/nostalgic purpose.

    Some people spend thousands on a holiday. Holidays can't be resold once taken. On the other hand someone might get a kick out of playing with a lot of the old computers they could never afford for just a few hundred bucks. Either way, a good time has been had.

    Tez
    ------------------------------------------------
    My vintage collection: http://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/index.htm
    My vintage activities blog: http://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
    Twitter: @classiccomputNZ

  8. #8

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    Tez has a very interesting point - buying even one of the expensive units is probably cheaper than a premium vacation. Some people's hobbies, like owning a boat, RC aircraft, RV, jeep, etc. can be quite expensive. By comparison, vintage computing is reasonably cheap, even with the rising prices.

    - Earl
    Visit the Retrobits Podcast - http://www.retrobits.com - Old Skool Computing, Modern Day Fun!

  9. #9

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    I agree with Tez and retrobits, but only if you consider direct costs. As of indirect costs like home space, that's another world. At least for me, space has become a limitation for this hobby. Can't count the number of old computers, but i can tell you they do take a lot of space at home... and wife notice it too... still no complaining though

    Jose

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    1,161

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    Quote Originally Posted by mac512 View Post
    ...they do take a lot of space at home... and wife notice it too... still no complaining though
    .... At least where you can hear her, anyways
    ---
    Currently seeking:
    * Roland MPU-401/AT (with daughter card header)
    * Magitronic K-156 Keyboard (5pin DIN w/ XT-AT switch)
    I also collect PC and C64 Sierra On-Line software!

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